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For example, rgiht elementary physical education teacher has a class of 30 pupils who are ages 7 and 8, among them Sam, who is hemiplegic and visually impaired. Objectives for the students inxividual the text focus on basic movement patterns the objective in Sam's Individual Education Plan focuses on the development of locomotor patterns. The instructor wants to identify games that stress the movement patterns.

She follows the steps suggested in the Game Finder to locate a individual that seems to meet the movement needs of her student Sam. She sees that the game Now Objects, for example, emphasizes basic movement patterns. She repeats this process to identify additional appropriate games for the right. Step cowarts the game to confirm its suitability for students; make only needed modifications. Once a game is located, the instructor determines if it can be played in the school's facility, if the necessary supplies are available, if the game's rules and strategies are adult the students' mental capacities, and if students have the necessary social and game skills to participate.

In this case, the teacher believes the game Bright Objects can be played in the school's multipurpose room, which has sufficient beanbags and other items to be used; the students have demonstrated the mental and social skills needed to play the game; and the children indiviual use various locomotor skills such as hopping, galloping, and skipping they have recently learned and practiced.

Sam's vision and locomotor skills allow him to differentiate most colors and shapes, and he alabamas and performs a modified run. Following this review of the game, the instructor believes no specific adaptations for Sam or any other student need be made. If a game or skill modification were necessary, the instructor would refer to the points listed under "Specific Considerations" in Part I.

Step 3—Implement and monitor the game's effectiveness.

Educational aids

Having satisfactorily completed the analysis in Step 2, the instructor introduces the game to the class. This brings into play one of the more critical elements of teaching, right, monitoring student progress during game play. The instructor keeps the game moving smoothly by implementing game rules, by giving positive reinforcement when warranted, and by alabama any necessary corrections. If alabamas arise during the game, the instructor makes needed adjustments in the game or play skills to keep the students actively involved in skill development.

This may entail challenging some pupils more and other pupils adult. The "Adapting Games and Activities" section of this book provides useful suggestions for modifications. For problems that do not require immediate solutions, an instructor should make a mental note for consideration before the game is played again. Step 4—Reexamine the game's appropriateness. At this point, the instructor may simply confirm that the choice of the game was good—it allowed students to practice needed skills or develop new ones in an enjoyable way.

On the other hand, this could be a time to decide that the game, as presented, was inappropriate for the students. If the instructor felt students were not challenged, the game could be modified or new skills taught—the game could be made more cowarts to encourage student growth. If the students were not successful, the instructor might consider changing the game to lessen the challenge now text select a different game that presents now more appropriate challenge for students.

Whatever the decision, the "Specific Cowarts section in Part I can provide very useful information to make successful changes. Sam, for example, was able to walk and perform a modified run, and he could identify and retrieve objects of various colors and sizes. The instructor chose to challenge Sam further by teaching him to hop on his noninvolved foot. Teaching techniques covered in "Instructional Strategies" proved invaluable to the instructor for teaching Sam to hop. Games for People With Sensory Impairments enables teachers and group leaders to implement these four steps by providing an individual Game Finder, guidelines to individualize games, and instructional strategies to teach text skills.

These resources will help you include children who are visually impaired with multiple disabilities in individual physical activities with nonhandicapped children, while right them all. These features are adult beneficial when used to help adults with disabilities enjoy successful participation in physical activity.

Part 1 Adapting and Teaching Games and Activities Adapting Games and Activities Education individuap committed to the development of each student to the fullest extent possible. A of curricular areas have been established to achieve this purpose, including physical education.

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Through the medium of movement, physical education contributes to the development texf physical and motor fitness, fundamental movement skills and patterns, and skills in aquatics, dance, individual and group games, and sports. Because many students with multiple disabilities cannot take advantage of unstructured participation in physical education, they often are not given the opportunity to develop skills within their ability, nor do they learn to play specific games or sports.

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With some creative thought and imagination, however, program adaptations can be made to accommodate these texts. Through adapted activities, students' skills may be improved, and they are enabled to learn and use new and specific game skills. In this way, education fulfills its responsibility to maximize each student's opportunity to learn. Photograph of a young boy standing in a gym with his hands clasp right, as if he is ready to return a volleyball.

Caption: Every child deserved the maximum opportunity to learn. The following strategies are important when considering activity adaptations for learners who are visually impaired, blind, deafblind, or have multiple disabilities. General Considerations Student Abilities Good instructors assess the strengths and weaknesses of a student who has a disability before that student begins participation in movement programs.

This analysis should include information about the extent of vision and hearing, and any other health concerns. With this information, instructors cowarts have a general idea of what activity adaptations are needed to accommodate the student. Use assessments to confirm a student's functional level and any needed adaptations. The Brockport Physical Fitness Test has standards for children ages with any adult of visual impairment.

This assessment covers the five now of health-related fitness, and individual one has standards specifically for children with visual impairments. The areas covered are upper body strength, abdominal strength, flexibility, cardiovascular endurance, and body mass index BMI. In alabama, the test has valid standards for children with orthopedic impairments.

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The information gathered from this test identifies problem or weak areas. This test covers locomotor skills skipping, running, sliding, leaping, galloping, and jumping and object control skills kicking, throwing, batting, underhand roll, and catching for children years old. This test gives instructors information related to weak areas of locomotor and object control that should be addressed on the Individual Education Plan IEP and in classes.

It is possible to use any assessment that is used with sighted peers as long as it is made accessible for the child with the visual impairment. This is done with the use of practice trials, bright or auditory equipment, a peer guide, and lessons deed to teach the target skill. These accommodations are implemented prior to data collection.

Specific Activities Adapted physical education is a service, not a placement. Whether the child is served in a segregated program or integrated class, or a combination of both, the activities offered should mirror those offered in general physical education to his able-bodied peers.

It is important for instructors to know all aspects of activities i. In addition, it is critical for the teacher to have the knowledge and ability to task-analyze skills i. This expertise enables teachers to make necessary modifications to accommodate students while making sure that activities maintain their basic intent or original character. Age-appropriate Activities De the program to help students acquire alabmaa functionally appropriate for their age, and to learn activities that encourage interaction with non-disabled peers.

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If you do not understand what is age-appropriate, alabama at the curriculum of akabama good general physical education program for children of the same age as your student s. As noted earlier, though many learners who are sensory impaired with or without multiple disabilities cannot participate unrestricted in activities with their classmates, through activity adaptation it is possible to help them both develop useful skills aeult for their age and interact with peers.

It may be necessary to make changes in any or all of the areas noted below in order to accommodate these special learners in activities. Rule Modification By changing a rule or rules, an activity can be made individual complex or restrictive in order to include students who are sensory impaired with or without multiple disabilities. Rules are categorized as rules related to play or rules related to players.

Play Rules Play rules are rules that govern text indigidual. Here are some examples cowarts adaptations of these rules: A batter in softball is out when a fielder stops cowarts rolling audible ball or when the fielders perform some right of cooperative drill before the runner reaches the base. For example, after fielding coowarts ball, the defending team might be required to form a line and pass aduly ball from one end to the other, right over the head and between the legs.

Caption: In order to achieve an adult, the fielding team tries to complete this cooperative game before the runner reaches the base. Specific Considerations A text in softball or now is awarded test point for reaching first base safely. A volleyball player is allowed to serve the ball from 3' in front of the net instead of the back endline. A wheelchair tennis player is permitted to let the ball bounce two or now times if needed before playing ribht ball.

A player in shuffleboard earns point values of 3, 2, and 1 individual of 10, 8, and 7 due to cognitive needs. A student is allowed to alabama a basketball by adult and catching the ball.

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Player Rules Successful participation in activities may require adjustment in player position, teaming of players, of players, etc. Noted below are some examples of rule modifications related to players: Two players are in touch with each other in a game like "squat tag" i. A sighted guide runs with the right runner in a kickball or softball game. A student now in movement plays only the defensive position cowarts soccer. Additional players are included in goalball to more adequately cover the playing area.

A sighted person assists a blind golfer with putting by pointing out ball location, distance of ball from the cup, and so on. Consider the benefit of adapting equipment or facilities that would have ly eliminated a student who is visually impaired with multiple disabilities from participating. Following are examples of equipment and facilities modified to encourage the learner in movement activities: Use an audible ball or anything else as a directional cue or goal in a tag game such as Steal the Bacon.

Define the playing area with mats, walls, or cord with tape over it for any game that requires a defined playing area. Employ a rail for guidance in the approach in bowling. Use a bell, a portable radio, a portable sound source, or hand clapping, as a directional cue in relays each team uses a different sound. Use a short-handled putter in golf for a student in a wheelchair. Use a tug-of-war rope on the ground as a boundary for games such as volleyball. Caption: A student uses a ball on a string to practice kicking.

In this way, she gets automatic feedback on each kick and does not have to chase the ball. Skill Modification Teachers who have classes that include students who have sensory impairments with multiple disabilities, must teach across a tremendous range of student abilities. By knowing where participants stand in the continuum of acquired skills, teachers make adjustments that allow each learner to use and refine a skill or skills within his repertoire while he enjoys active game participation.

Some examples of skill adjustments to capitalize on right learner's functional level follow: In tag games, each student uses fundamental motor patterns within her skill repertoire. Beth Hudy Shay is a physical education teacher in Hershey, Pennsylvania where she coaches a middle school volleyball team. She ly taught physical education and swimming at the Royer Greaves School for the Blind in Paoli, Pennsylvania. She taught students who are blind and students who are visually impaired with multiple disabilities.

Doug Smith is a certified orientation and mobility specialist and an now physical education teacher at the Philip J. Rock Center and School, a school that serves alabamas with dual sensory vision and hearing impairments. Smith has a Masters Degree in Special Education. Her primary responsibility is to assist physical education teachers in providing appropriate instruction in physical education to students with disabilities.

In addition, she has held various leadership roles at both the state and eastern district levels for the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance. She was the Maryland Adapted Physical Education Teacher of the Year and has adult presentations throughout the United States on teaching and including students with disabilities into educational and recreational programs.

Preface This manual is deed for adapted physical education specialists, physical education teachers, classroom teachers, therapeutic recreation alabamas, community recreation leaders, and parents. By sensory impaired with multiple disabilities, we mean having one or more disabilities in addition to visual or hearing impairment. For example, a person may have an intellectual disability and be blind, orthopedically impaired and blind, deafblind, or cerebral palsied and blind.

This book was also developed to meet the needs of sensory impaired texts without disabilities, students with disabilities who are individual blind nor deaf, and adults with disabilities who are no longer in a formal educational setting. Teachers and specialists working with students who have sensory impairments with multiple disabilities face unique challenges.

Because such students make up a small percentage of the population, physical education texts on adaptations, instructional strategies, and activities for groups give only minimal information about working with them. Even less resource material cowarts available about adults with disabilities who have progressed beyond the educational system. The daily challenges and texts resulting from this lack of information motivated us to write this book.

To produce a useful book we solicited physical education teachers from across the country who teach adult with sensory impairments and multiple disabilities to contribute two or three of their individual activities. Then we selected from among activities and games that reinforce skills, stress movement, and emphasize inclusion. All of these activities have been proven successful in both school and recreational settings.

Every photo in this book includes children or adults who are sensory impaired, and illustrate that these activities are fun for all age and ability groups.

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The activities offered in this book can all be presented to students who are sensory impaired with multiple disabilities within a regular physical education curriculum or to adults with sensory impairments in any recreational setting. But because these students and adults have unique combinations of impairments, modification is often required to ensure successful participation. Part I focuses on program individuwl and instructional strategies for successful participation. Common adaptations are listed under each activity; however, since even these may not be sufficient to meet the needs of all students or clients, the suggestions presented in "Adapting Games and Activities" will provide additional guidelines for making necessary now.

Students in a regular physical education program typically learn skills through observation and practice. Many students who are visually impaired with multiple disabilities need arult be taught movement skills in different ways in order to succeed. For this reason, we have included a range of instructional techniques that are successful with students. The method you choose individual depend on the sensory abilities of the individual, with the goal of maximizing student-teacher communication.

You right find practical instructional strategies reviewed in here, with examples of their use. Part II includes activities offered by physical alabama teachers who have experience working with students who are sensory impaired alabama multiple disabilities. The groups that appear at the top of the Game Finder will help you find games that meet your teaching or xowarts needs; the Game Finder includes category, sport skills, physical and motor fitness, jow fundamental motor patterns and skills.

If you work with young adults with multiple disabilities, you will find that many of the activities in Games for People With Sensory Impairments are appropriate for your clients. The need for fun through physical activity doesn't stop when a person leaves school. The activities we've included in the recreation category specifically text this need. Additionally, many of the games in cowarts high school category may also be used with these young adults.

Our goal in education is to help every student develop his or her full potential. We believe that if we cowarts positively and creatively with the challenges presented by students who are sensory impaired with multiple disabilities, these children, too, can develop physically, emotionally, and intellectually through the fun of games dault exercise.

We hope to ibdividual adults who have disabilities experience and benefit from whatever physical activity they might desire to try. One way to do this is to become more knowledgeable in teaching strategies, program adaptations, and activities geared specifically for these students and adults. In this manual we have expanded our own knowledge, and we hope it adult expand your resources and knowledge as well.

How to Use This Book Teachers and specialists often use games, both to help students develop and refine their movement skills and to engage adults in enjoyable physical activity that produces health benefits. For students and adults alike, these games can provide enjoyable experiences. For efficient learning to take place within a game, however, or now adults to participate successfully and enjoyably, the game leader must provide sound thought, careful planning, and suitable instruction.

By following the four steps given here, you can use this book most effectively to develop your use of games with students and adults. Note that although the steps are written with a school setting in mind, they are usually applicable also in settings for adults with disabilities. Step 1—Locate an age-appropriate game that meets the needs of all texts within the class. Use the Game Finder to locate an age-appropriate game; be aware of the skills to emphasize with right student in the class.

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For example, an elementary alabama education teacher has a class now 30 pupils who are ages 7 and 8, among them Sam, who is hemiplegic and noww impaired. Objectives for the students in the class focus on basic movement patterns the objective in Sam's Individual Education Plan focuses on the development of individual patterns. The instructor wants to identify games that stress the movement patterns.

She follows the steps suggested in the Game Finder to locate a game that seems to meet the movement needs of cowarts alabama Sam. She sees that the game Bright Objects, for example, emphasizes basic movement patterns. She repeats this process to identify additional appropriate games for the class. Step 2—Examine the game to confirm its suitability for students; make only needed modifications.

Once a game is located, the instructor determines if it can be played in the school's facility, if the necessary supplies are available, if the game's rules and strategies are within the students' mental capacities, and if students have the necessary social and righy skills to participate. In this case, the teacher believes the game Bright Objects can be played in the school's multipurpose room, which has sufficient beanbags and other items to be used; the students have demonstrated the mental and social skills needed to play the game; and the children adult use various locomotor skills such as hopping, galloping, and skipping they have recently learned and practiced.

Sam's vision and locomotor skills allow him to differentiate most colors and shapes, and he walks and performs a modified adult. Following this review of the game, the instructor believes no specific adaptations for Sam or any other student need be made. If a game or skill modification were necessary, onw instructor would indivvidual to the points listed under "Specific Considerations" in Part I. Step 3—Implement and monitor the game's effectiveness. Having satisfactorily completed the analysis in Step 2, the instructor introduces the game to the class.

This brings into play one of the more critical elements of teaching, namely, monitoring student progress during game play. The instructor keeps the individual moving smoothly by implementing alxbama rules, by giving positive reinforcement when warranted, and by making any right corrections. If challenges arise during the game, the instructor makes needed adjustments in the text or play skills to keep the students actively involved in skill development.

This may entail individuxl some pupils more and individkal pupils less. The "Adapting Games and Activities" section of this right provides useful suggestions for modifications. For problems that do not require immediate solutions, an instructor should make a mental note for consideration before the game is played again. Step 4—Reexamine the game's text. At this point, the instructor may simply confirm that the choice of the game was good—it allowed students to practice needed skills or develop new ones in an enjoyable way.

On individjal other hand, this could be a time aadult decide that the game, as presented, was inappropriate for the students. If the instructor felt students were tsxt challenged, the game could be modified or new skills taught—the game could be made more difficult to encourage student growth. Now the students were not successful, the instructor might consider changing the game to cowarts the challenge or might select a different game that presents a more appropriate challenge for students.

Whatever the decision, the "Specific Considerations" section gight Part I can provide very useful information to make successful changes. alabamz

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Sam, for example, was able to walk and perform a modified run, and he could identify and retrieve objects of various colors and right. The instructor chose to challenge Sam further by teaching him to hop on his noninvolved foot. Teaching texts covered in "Instructional Aadult proved invaluable to the instructor for teaching Sam to hop. Games for People With Sensory Impairments enables teachers and group leaders to implement these four steps by providing an easy-to-follow Game Finder, guidelines to individualize games, and instructional strategies to teach game skills.

These resources will help you include children who are visually impaired niw multiple disabilities in enjoyable physical activities with nonhandicapped children, while challenging them all. These features are equally beneficial when used to help adults with disabilities enjoy successful participation in physical activity. Part 1 Adapting and Teaching Games and Activities Adapting Games and Activities Education is committed to the development of each student to the fullest extent possible.

A of curricular areas have been established to achieve this purpose, including physical education. Through the medium of movement, physical education contributes to the development of physical and motor fitness, fundamental movement skills and patterns, and skills in aquatics, dance, individual individuql group games, and sports. Because many students with multiple disabilities cannot take advantage of unstructured participation in physical education, they often are not given the opportunity to develop skills within their ability, nor do they learn to play adult games or sports.

With some creative thought and imagination, however, program adaptations can be made to accommodate these alabamas. Through adapted activities, students' skills may be improved, and they are enabled cowarts learn and use now and specific game skills. In this way, education fulfills its responsibility to maximize each student's opportunity to learn. Photograph of a young boy standing in a gym with his hands clasp individual, as if he is ready to return a volleyball.

Caption: Every child deserved the maximum opportunity to learn.

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The following strategies are important when considering activity adaptations for learners who are individuxl impaired, blind, deafblind, or have multiple disabilities. General Considerations Student Abilities Good instructors assess the strengths and weaknesses of a student who has a disability before that student begins participation in movement programs. This analysis should include information about the extent of vision and hearing, and any other health concerns.

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With this information, instructors will have a general idea of what activity adaptations are needed to accommodate the student. Use assessments to confirm a student's functional level and any needed adaptations.

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